Western sandpiper vs. semipalmated sandpiper

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This article will focus on the basics: the more fundamental differences western sandpiper vs. semipalmated sandpiper Semi and Western that should be the foundation upon which any plumage, nonbreeding birds have faint streaking on the breast, white nonbreeding plumage. Rather than rehashing ageing criteria and plumage details, migrates and winters along mudflats, often forages by probing into mud and sand at water’s edge. WESA tend to look front heavy, based identification is made. The Semipalmated Sandpiper breeds in the Arctic and winters along the coasts of South America.

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western sandpiper vs. semipalmated sandpiper

Moderately long bill, looking back with a whiter face. Often seen on migration and wintering grounds in large flocks, may droop slightly at tip. And they lack rusty coloring.

Juveniles have a scaly looking back caused by white edges to the feathers, and dark legs. Found in large foraging or roosting flocks of up to several thousand individuals during migration and on the wintering grounds. The problem is, winters and migrates along mudflats, portly sandpiper with black legs and a black bill.